National War Correspondents Memorial

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Standing tall at Gathland State Park in Jefferson, Maryland is the National War Correspondents Memorial honoring journalists killed in combat.

Built in 1896 at Crampton’s Gap, a location where the first major civil war battle occurred in Maryland at the Battle of South Mountain. A peculiar memorial with Roman influences including horse heads and Pan playing his flutes, this memorial helps us to remember those who gave their lives to document and share the stories of war.

The Appalachian Trail passes through this park which was once the home of Civil War journalist, George Alfred Townsend who’s pen name was Gath.

Gone and nearly forgotten, but the monument stands to remind us of human sacrifice in the name of knowledge.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Monument Text:

SPEED – HEED
Sept. 14 – 62 – 96

To the Army Correspondents
and Artists 1861-65

Whose toils cheered the fireside
Educated provinces of rustics into
a bright nation of readers
and gave incentive to narrate
distant wars and explore dark lands.

Erected by subscriptions
1896

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7 thoughts on “National War Correspondents Memorial

    • To know that I was in the same place where a civil war battle occurred is always chilling. This park is so beautiful, and I can imagine what it would have been like to have an estate set there.

      And the Appalachian Trail rocks – you would love hiking it.

    • Thanks Ilex ! Thinking about it, the war correspondents are literally behind the camera. Risking life and limb all to document and tell the story of our changing and violent world. They sacrifice their safety to bring the truth home. Truly amazing.

  1. Cool monument. I certainly appreciate its purpose especially in a day and age where the passing and acceptance of information is so widespread and yet so under-appreciated. Today people risk their lives to get a story in every arena; it’s hard to imagine what it was like, how hard it had to be, back then in the early days of journalism. I wonder if they carried the same clout and/or disdain that journalists do today. Story-telling is not doubt an invaluable part of life. 🙂 Thanks for reminding us.

    • You’re always able to see the real truth in what I see and share. Just thinking about how these journalists stand next to an armed soldier, all to be able to tell the tale to others. Such daring, such courage. They are unspoken heroes and it warms the heart to know this memorial exists. Thanks!

      • Well said. The nerves it would take, there’s much to be said about that. Serious bravery considering your risking your life for a story that’s not going to get told if you lose your life!

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