Project 365/134 – Pride of Baltimore II

A maritime good will ambassador was born in Baltimore Harbor in 1977. The Baltimore Clipper ship named the Pride of Baltimore was an authentic replica of original Baltimore Clipper ships that was used during the War of 1812. Well revered by sailors, this fast clipper was a popular design that was replicated by pirates, privateers, and slave runners that wanted swift sea transportation.

In less than ten years, the Pride of Baltimore clocked more than 150,00 nautical miles on its quest as an ambassador. Tragedy hit on May 14, 1986 when the Pride of Baltimore was returning from St. Thomas, U.S.V.I. and was lost at sea with four crew members due to hurricane force winds.

Her successor, the Pride of Baltimore II set sail two years later to continue the journey of ambassadorship. Her recent stop was in Annapolis for a weekend city celebration.

Pride of Baltimore II

Pride of Baltimore II

The Pride II is not a replica of an exact previous vessel, but rather was built according to specifications of an original clipper with modern conveniences considered.

The Pride II is 108 feet long, with a 28 foot beam. Weighing 197 tons, this size and weight allow great sailing distances and has traveled from the United States to Europe. While in France in 2005, the entire mast was taken down by a squall in Bay of Biscay. Limping home on motor power, the Pride II was repaired and returned to service.

Boats14may13-4872-Edit

While taking in the incredible detail of this magnificent ship, with the perfectly varnished wood, the well placed boat ropes, winches, and so much more. I began to hear the lovely sounds of a well played guitar. Sitting on the dock next to the Pride was Andrew, a crew mate of the ship playing his custom made guitar.

Andrew Elmaleh, deckhand

Andrew Elmaleh, deckhand

The ship and its crew are truly unique. This is what adventure is all about, discovering new things, appreciating the past, meeting special people and dreaming of exploration.

32 thoughts on “Project 365/134 – Pride of Baltimore II

  1. This is exactly what adventure is all about… the ship exudes it & makes me feel excited about the world ‘out there’! That custom guitar is pretty awesome too! Great post )

  2. You just reminded me of one of my favourite poems about the sea. I hope you don’t mind that I am including it in my comments. It just seemed so perfect! It is called “A Wet Sheet And A Flowing Sea.” By Allan Cunningham. (1784-1842)

    A wet sheet and a flowing sea,
    A wind that follows fast,
    And fills the white and rustling sail,
    And bends the gallant mast;
    And bends the gallant mast, my boys,
    While, like the eagle free,
    Away the good ship flies, and leaves
    Old England on the lee.

    O for a soft and gentle wind!
    I heard a fair one cry;
    But give to me the snoring breeze,
    And white waves heaving high;
    And white waves having high, my boys,
    The good ship tight and free –
    The world of waters is our home,
    And merry men are we.

    There ‘s tempest in yon horned moon,
    And lightning in yon cloud;
    And hark the music, mariners!
    The wind is piping loud;
    The wind is piping loud, my boys,
    The lightning flashing free –
    While the hollow oak our palace is,
    Our heritage the sea.

  3. Despite my lack of desire to sail, I love watching these re-built, re-created and replicated ships sailing into harbour.
    I once saw one, the Duyfken I believe, sail into Port Hedland while I was surveying in a pile. So surreal to see such a vessel drift through my sites, passing giant ore carrying ships.

  4. Pingback: - HORA DO POVO | SCOMBROS

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s